Windows Vista support has ended

Windows Vista
As of April 11, 2017, Windows Vista customers are no longer receiving new security updates, non-security hotfixes, free or paid assisted support options, or online technical content updates from Microsoft. Microsoft has provided support for Windows Vista for the past 10 years, but the time has come for us, along with our hardware and software partners, to invest our resources towards more recent technologies so that we can continue to deliver great new experiences.

Microsoft announced on Tuesday that it’s ending all support for Windows Vista, effective immediately.

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer pictured above has famously called Windows Vista his biggest regret. It was eventually replaced two years later by Windows 7. Your copy of Windows Vista isn’t just going to stop working, but there are many reasons why you should upgrade to something newer. (I recommend Windows 10.)

First, Microsoft will stop issuing all security updates, hotfixes and support options for Windows Vista. That means your system could potentially be more vulnerable to hacks, malware and other attacks, since Microsoft won’t be working to make sure it’s secure.

“If you continue to use Windows Vista after support has ended, your computer will still work but it might become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses,” Microsoft said in its support forums. “Internet Explorer 9 is no longer supported, so if your Windows Vista PC is connected to the Internet and you use Internet Explorer 9 to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Also, as more software and hardware manufacturers continue to optimize for more recent versions of Windows, you can expect to encounter more apps and devices that do not work with Windows Vista. ”

You can find out if you’re running Windows Vista by opening the start menu and typing “winver” in the search box. Open “Winver” and then open “About Windows.” If you see “Windows Vista,” well, it’s time to move on.

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SOURCE: CNBC